Workplace Kindness Downloadable Prompt

Workplace Kindness Downloadable Prompt

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This prompt invites you to create three written or visual kindness messages: one for yourself, one for someone you consider a close coworker, and one for someone you struggle with at work. Think of a truly kind, authentic message to put in each heart. You may decide to share the message with the person it is intended for or keep it to yourself. 

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Capitalizing on the research from the field of Positive Psychology and the teachings of Loving-kindness, this prompt invites you to create three written or visual kindness messages: one for yourself, one for someone you consider a close coworker, and one for someone you struggle with at work. Think of a truly kind, authentic message to put in each heart. Focusing on these positive messages may have benefits beyond a better day at work; the research suggests those who think and act with a focus on positivity can experience greater mental, physical, and emotional health outcomes: “prioritizing positivity was associated with a host of beneficial well-being indicators” (Catalino, Algoe, & Fredrickson, 2014, p. 1159).  Compassion training and loving-kindness has been associated with reduced stress as well as increased resilience, connectedness and job satisfaction (Jazaieri et al., 2014; Salter et al., 2013; Scarlet, Altmeyer, Knier, & Harpin, 2017; Seppala, Hutcherson, Nguyen, Doty, & Gross, 2014). We suggest exploring the use of different colors or materials; try cutting some images from magazines or incorporating different colors for each message.

References:

Catalino, L. I., Algoe, S. B., & Fredrickson, B. L. (2014). Prioritizing positivity: An effective approach to pursuing happiness? Emotion, 14(6), 1155–1161. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0038029

Jazaieri, H., McGonigal, K., Jinpa, T., Doty, J. R., Gross, J. J., & Goldin, P. R. (2014). A randomized controlled trial of compassion cultivation training: Effects on mindfulness, affect, and emotion regulation. Motivation and Emotion, 38(1), 23–35. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11031-013-9368-z

Salter, M. D., Blehar, M. C., Waters, E., Susan, M., Carver, C. S., Antoni, M. H., & Weiss, S. (2013). Social connection and compassion: Important predictors of health and well-being. Social Research, 80(2), 411–430.

Scarlet, J., Altmeyer, N., Knier, S., & Harpin, R. E. (2017). The effects of Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) on health-care workers. Clinical Psychologist, 21(2), 116–124. https://doi.org/10.1111/cp.12130

Seppala, E. M., Hutcherson, C. A., Nguyen, D. T., Doty, J. R., & Gross, J. J. (2014). Loving-kindness meditation: A tool to improve healthcare provider compassion, resilience, and patient care. Journal of Compassionate Health Care, 1(1), 5. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40639-014-0005-9